Recovery Takes Time

“Always remember that the future comes one day at a time” (Dean Acheson)

The concept of time in recovery is widely discussed when it comes to treatment of substance use disorders. It is reported that those who stay in treatment longer have higher rates of success for long-term sobriety. Turnbridge’s philosophy, which includes three Phases of integration, is designed to help clients learn how to live a life without drugs and focuses on the concept of ‘one day at a time’.

While becoming substance free is the first step on the journey to recovery, there are many other areas that are essential to maintaining long-term sobriety. During the beginning stages of treatment a common question asked by clients is, “When can I get back to my life”? Clients new to sobriety often feel that if they are free from drugs that they are ‘ok now’ and ‘ready to go back to their lives’. Unfortunately, the recovery process is not that simple.

Additional time in treatment provides an opportunity for clients to gain the necessary tools and to experience firsthand what living in recovery entails. At Turnbridge, clients are surrounded by clinical and residential staff to help them through this process and work on issues as they arise throughout the process. By providing support during each transitional phase clients are able to experience all the ups and downs that are a part of recovery while also practicing how to cope with this new way of living before transitioning to the next stage of their lives.

Specifically, clients have the ability to learn new ways to cope with emotions and feelings through groups, skill building activities and in individual sessions with their therapist. Longer periods of treatment allow clients the opportunity to practice and begin to implement these new skills in preparation for their journey in recovery outside of treatment. Clients at Turnbridge are able to practice these skills through volunteer work, attending classes, and working in the community. This gives the clinical team a chance to work with clients on implementing these necessary skills in the moment. In turn, this helps clients learn that they are able to cope with issues without using drugs and prepares them to continue using these skills after treatment.

Long term drug treatment has the benefit of helping clients begin their journey of recovery with support and education surrounding their addiction. Time allows clients and their families affected by addiction the opportunity to experience what life can be like in recovery and help to build a healthy and rewarding future.